Harry Connick, Jr. Chanson du Vieux Carré

As a Sinatra-molded swinger, Harry Connick, Jr. may have had some of his thunder stolen by young star Michael Buble. But with his raved-about performance on Broadway in Pajama Game and his continuing development as a jazz pianist, he’s doing quite nicely, thank you. Chanson du Vieux Carre is one of two new simultaneously released big band tributes to his hometown of New Orleans by him. Read more »

Submitted by admin on November 9th, 2008 — 01:00am

JIMMY COBB NAMED NEA JAZZ MASTER, AND OTHER HONORS

Date: 11.03.2008
Publication: MM Newsletter
Author: Marsalis Music Read more »

Submitted by Ben on November 3rd, 2008 — 01:00am

Harry For the Holidays…Find out what's new for Harry this holiday season on disc, on stage…and on the road!

Among contemporary musicians, few have been able to bring as fresh and sincere approach to the holidays as Harry Connick, Jr. He not only interprets seasonal standards in the spirit that is at the core of all of his singing and playing, but he also has written several compositions that are gaining annual traction. With two best-selling holiday discs already to his credit, Connick is releasing What a Night! – A Christmas Album tomorrow (November 4) on Columbia, where he makes his vocal home. Read more »

Submitted by admin on November 3rd, 2008 — 01:00am

After 50 years, 'Kind of Blue' is still a classic. And Miles lives.

Date: 10.27.2008
Publication: Philadelphia Daily News
Author: Shaun Brady


LIKE SO MANY occasions that turn out to be momentous in hindsight, the recording of Miles Davis’ landmark “Kind of Blue” album carried no special aura, no hint of the iconic future in store. “I just figured it was another good Miles Davis record,” shrugged drummer Jimmy Cobb.

“Just one that I happened to be on.”

It hardly needs to be said that Cobb’s impression is a vast understatement. In the 50 years since its release, “Kind of Blue” has come to be regarded as a landmark, the pinnacle not only of Davis’ output but perhaps of jazz itself. It’s almost certainly the best-selling jazz album of all time, and it has a place in the record collection of many a listener who would otherwise profess to a dislike of jazz.
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Submitted by Ben on October 27th, 2008 — 12:00am

Chatting With Jimmy Cobb, Kind of Blue's Last Surviving Player: Remembering the greatest jazz album of all time, 50 years on

Date: 10.08.2008
Publication: Village Voice
Author: Rob Trucks


Jimmy Cobb is early. The sole surviving performer on Miles Davis’s 1959 album Kind of Blue is waiting in a sixth-floor conference room just blocks from Columbia’s old 30th Street Studios, the converted (Greek, Russian, or Armenian, depending on whom you ask) Orthodox church where the best-selling, most widely praised jazz album in history was recorded. The drummer and Harlem resident passes the time with his new iPhone—right now, unfortunately, it appears that if Cobb so much as stares at the gadget, it automatically calls his daughter. Thus far, hers is the only number programmed.
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Submitted by Ben on October 8th, 2008 — 12:00am