marsalis music honors


Date: 11.03.2008
Publication: MM Newsletter
Author: Marsalis Music Read more »

Submitted by Ben on November 3rd, 2008 — 01:00am

After 50 years, 'Kind of Blue' is still a classic. And Miles lives.

Date: 10.27.2008
Publication: Philadelphia Daily News
Author: Shaun Brady

LIKE SO MANY occasions that turn out to be momentous in hindsight, the recording of Miles Davis’ landmark “Kind of Blue” album carried no special aura, no hint of the iconic future in store. “I just figured it was another good Miles Davis record,” shrugged drummer Jimmy Cobb.

“Just one that I happened to be on.”

It hardly needs to be said that Cobb’s impression is a vast understatement. In the 50 years since its release, “Kind of Blue” has come to be regarded as a landmark, the pinnacle not only of Davis’ output but perhaps of jazz itself. It’s almost certainly the best-selling jazz album of all time, and it has a place in the record collection of many a listener who would otherwise profess to a dislike of jazz.
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Submitted by Ben on October 27th, 2008 — 12:00am

Chatting With Jimmy Cobb, Kind of Blue's Last Surviving Player: Remembering the greatest jazz album of all time, 50 years on

Date: 10.08.2008
Publication: Village Voice
Author: Rob Trucks

Jimmy Cobb is early. The sole surviving performer on Miles Davis’s 1959 album Kind of Blue is waiting in a sixth-floor conference room just blocks from Columbia’s old 30th Street Studios, the converted (Greek, Russian, or Armenian, depending on whom you ask) Orthodox church where the best-selling, most widely praised jazz album in history was recorded. The drummer and Harlem resident passes the time with his new iPhone—right now, unfortunately, it appears that if Cobb so much as stares at the gadget, it automatically calls his daughter. Thus far, hers is the only number programmed.
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Submitted by Ben on October 8th, 2008 — 12:00am

New Recordings: Bob French

Date: 01.06.2008
Publication: The Philadelphia Inquirer
Author: Karl Stark

(Marsalis Music ***)

The generations conjoin on this stacked Dixieland recording. The tribute goes to longtime New Orleans drummer Bob French, who runs the city’s longest continuing band, the Original Tuxedo Jazz Orchestra, nearing a full century of performance. (The band was run for many years by his banjo-playing father, Albert “Papa” French.)

Bob French is a righteous player even the hurricane couldn’t wash away. The supporting cast tips you to his importance: Pianist Harry Connick plays the whole set; so does saxophonist Branford Marsalis.
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Submitted by Ben on January 6th, 2008 — 01:00am

A moving celebration: Flashes of brilliance at BeanTown jazz tribute

Date: 10.01.2007
Publication: Boston Globe
Author: Kevin Lowenthal

Friday night, at Symphony Hall, the BeanTown Jazz Festival opened with an all-star offering that came within at least shouting distance of its advance billing as “concert of the century.” Titled “A Celebration of Jazz and Joyce,” the concert’s personnel was lovingly assembled by jazz impresario George Wein, the proceeds benefiting the Berklee scholarship fund named in honor of his late wife, Joyce Alexander Wein.

The show opened with rousing quintet versions of Thelonious Monk’s “I Mean You” and Tadd Dameron’s “Hot House.” Bassist Ray Drummond and drummer Jimmy Cobb were a Rolls-Royce of a rhythm section. Saxophonist Lew Tabackin and trumpeter Jon Faddis blended beautifully and soloed commandingly. On the second tune, Cobb traded whirlwind eight-bar solos with the other four.
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Submitted by Ben on October 1st, 2007 — 12:00am

The Honors Series Continues…2007

Date: 06.04.2007
Publication: Marsalis Music Read more »

Submitted by Ben on June 4th, 2007 — 12:00am

Michael Carvin

Date: 03.14.2006
Publication: Marsalis Music
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Submitted by Ben on March 14th, 2006 — 01:00am