Amanecer just might be the album that gets his gifts as both a composer and a solo pianist embraced on a greater scale.

Date: 07.01.2007
Publication: Jazz Times
Author: Mike Shanley


Joey Calderazzo is best known as a member of bands led by Branford Marsalis and the late Michael Brecker, but Amanecer just might be the album that gets his gifts as both a composer and a solo pianist embraced on a greater scale. Granted, he has eight previous albums to his credit, dating back 16 years and this isn’t his first solo album (that was Haiku, released in 2003). Additionally, this isn’t strictly solo: four pieces here actually feature him in duo or trio settings with vocalist Claudia Acuña and guitarist Romera Lubamambo.
Read more »

Submitted by Ben on July 1st, 2007 — 12:00am

Marsalis Music Honors Alvin Batiste

Date: 07.01.2007
Publication: Coda
Author: Nick Pitt Read more »

Submitted by Ben on July 1st, 2007 — 12:00am

Doug Wamble To Explore The World Of William Faulkner Thanks To Composition Grant

Publication: Jazz Times
Author: Marsalis Music


Congratulations are in order to Marsalis Music artist Doug Wamble, who recently learned that he had been awarded a New Works grant from Chamber Music America. The grant program, which supports the creation of new music by established ensembles with a history of performing original music featuring jazz improvisation, will allow Wamble to compose an extended piece for his working quartet plus horns that provides a sound portrait of the fictional world of William Faulkner.
Read more »

Submitted by Ben on July 1st, 2007 — 12:00am

Alvin Batiste

Date: 06.18.2007
Publication: PopMatters.com
Author: Will Layman

  Read more »

Submitted by Ben on June 18th, 2007 — 12:00am

Bonnaroo: Hippie Fashion Statements and Protest Songs

Date: 06.17.2007
Publication: The New York Times
Author: Jon Pareles

 

Back in the 1960’s, the hippie counterculture briefly looked like a political opposition to a protracted war. At Bonnaroo this year, hippie fashion statements also go with protest songs and anti-Bush pronouncements. Perhaps that’s no surprise at a festival that includes longtime politically inclined rappers like the Roots, Michael Franti and El-P, who tour to the same collegiate audience that comes to Bonnaroo. Friday’s lineup also included Manu Chao, the globe-trotting, mostly Spanish-speaking songwriter whose hopped-up reggae and ska songs decry violence and poverty, support human rights (especially for immigrants and displaced people) and savor romance and marijuana.
Read more »

Submitted by Ben on June 17th, 2007 — 12:00am